Medication over 100ml in hand luggage. What airlines and airports say

With many people suffering from medical conditions that require prescription medication, it is essential that travellers understand the rules before they arrive at the airport and try to board planes heading to their destinations.

While you will be able to carry essential medicine while flying, you will need to make sure you comply with the rules set for both your airport and airline - as these will differ depending on the combination.

 Our guide here will help you get an indication of what is required. Here we look at what the airlines and airports say about carrying medication, including liquids that exceed current 100ml limits.

Find out how to carry essential medicine on planesFind out if you how to carry medicines on planes airline-by-airline and airport-by-airport  (Credit: Pxhere)

Aer Lingus     

Aer Lingus says medication should be packed in your carry-on baggage and not in checked luggage.

If you have liquid medicines over 100ml or syringes, the airline’s customer service says they can be carried in a cabin bag if in the original packaging and with a doctor’s note. Always check with your departure airport.

Air Canada    

Air Canada says passengers should carry medication in the cabin and in the original packaging. However, medicines containing alcohol must be transported in checked luggage.

Air New Zealand      

Passengers should remember to pack medications they might need during the journey in carry-on baggage, says Air Canada. It also points out that civil aviation rules require medicines to have a pharmacy printed label. For liquids in containers over 100ml, it recommends passengers carry a letter from their doctor.

British Airways         

British Airways says if passengers need to take medication, including liquid medication or syringes, they should pack it in hand baggage (if possible, in its original packaging). To avoid delays at airport security, also take a prescription or supporting letter from a doctor that confirming that it is prescribed to the passenger.

easyJet          

If bringing medicine on board, passengers must also provide a doctor’s certificate confirming the type of medication and what it is being used for. Passengers will also be able to bring liquid medicines larger than 100ml through security if they have a doctor’s certificate.

Jet2    

Jet2 says, all essential medications required for the duration of a passenger’s journey should be carried in their hand luggage. Essential liquid medication that comes in quantities over 100ml must be accompanied by a certified doctor's letter. These medicines must be in their original containers. The airline also points out that bottles and packaging may need to be opened by airport security during screening.

Jet2 also says those who need to carry syringes, needles, insulin pens, EpiPens and associated medication in the cabin, must have a letter from their doctor confirming they are required. If injections are required during the flight, they must be self-administered. It adds the passenger should ensure airport security will allow such medical equipment.

Passengers must declare they are carrying needles at check-in, airport security, and to Jet2 cabin crew when boarding the aircraft.

Ryanair          

You are allowed to carry liquid medicine required for your flight. The medicine does not need to fit in the transparent bag but you should have it ready for inspection by airport security, according to Ryanair.

TUI     

Passengers can take medication into the cabin for their TUI flight. However, they must bring a doctor's letter or repeat prescription – especially so if the medication is a liquid, as this will be needed at security.

Passengers can carry insulin and injection pen in hand luggage - but you'll need to declare this at check in. They will also need to show a doctor's letter or approved diabetic card.

Virgin Atlantic          

Virgin says: “If you are likely to need to take medication during the flight, you should bring enough in your hand baggage to last you for the journey, plus two or three days just in case of delay or loss of baggage. The rest should be packed in your check in baggage and placed in the hold, where the temperature is kept between 4-5°C.”

It also says passengers should ensure they have a letter from their medical practitioner confirming the type of medication (including generic drug name), with prescribed doses, what the medication is being used for and any other medical items that may be needed, such as syringes or EpiPens.

The medication should be in its original packaging and labelled to clearly identify it as being prescribed for and belonging to the passenger in question.

Virgin also points out that some medication may contain ingredients that are illegal in some countries, such as codeine in some painkillers, even when prescribed by a doctor in the UK. Check with the destination’s UK embassy if you have concerns.

For liquid medication in quantities exceeding 100ml, Virgin Atlantic urges passengers to take advice from airport security ahead of travel.  

Wizz Air         

We recommend all passengers to bring their essentials into the cabin (such as personal hygiene items and medicines). In case you did not purchase WIZZ Priority and checked-in your hand luggage you might take out personal items and bring them into the cabin. When carrying medication in a liquid form, please check the safety regulations for carrying liquids on board. In cases where you need to carry essential medications, such as insulin, you will need to have a medical certificate with you confirming that you need the medication and present this document at the airport security if required.

Travelling to the UAE with medication

In October 2018, the United Arab Emirates Ministry of Health said that tourists and residents planning to enter the country with medication for personal use will need to obtain approval before travelling.

An electronic form needs to be completed before you travel. This form can found here.

Find your repeat prescriptions

If you need to show your repeat prescriptions in an emergency, remember this information should be included on your NHS app.    

What the airports say about carrying medicines - and those over 100ml

Along with your airline's rules, you will need to comply with security requirements set out by your departure airport. Here we have the information available on UK airports regarding carrying medication in the form of liquids, powders and tablets. 

Aberdeen Airport    

“Passengers are allowed to take essential medicines sufficient for the trip. Amounts under 100ml should be placed in a transparent, plastic bag with other liquids.

For amounts over 100ml, prior approval from the airline and departure airport, and supporting documentation from a relevant qualified medical professional (egg a letter from your doctor or prescription), are required."             

Birmingham International Airport

“Prescription medicines are allowed in cabin baggage but you must carry supporting medical documentation for the prescription.”            

Bristol Airport

“You’re allowed to take the medicines with you that you need to sustain you for your flight, plus a reasonable amount to cover any delays. Anything else should go in your hold baggage.

Liquid, aerosol or gel medicines in containers of 100ml or less must be placed inside a clear bag. Liquid, aerosol or gel medicines over 100ml must be carried separately, together with supporting documentary proof of authenticity, such as a prescription label or letter from your doctor.

For prescription medicines, either the passenger’s name should be printed on the label or the passenger should have a note from a medical practitioner naming the passenger and stating that the individual requires the medicine in question.

A passenger should not be carrying medicines for other persons.”

East Midlands Airport

A passenger may take prescription medication in containers over 100ml through security, provided that they have a prescription or doctor's note for the medication. The passenger may only carry through security the quantity of liquid medication that is required for their journey.

Edinburgh Airport

“Don’t worry if you need to take liquid medication in your hand luggage! You can bring as much as you need for your trip even if it exceeds the 100 ml limits. Just make sure to let one of our Security Officers know and to bring either a prescription or doctor’s note with you.”

Exeter Airport                      

Exeter points passengers to official Government advice, as follows:

“You’re allowed to carry the following in your hand luggage:

  • essential medicines of more than 100ml, including liquid dietary foodstuffs and inhalers
  • medical equipment, if it’s essential for your journey

You’ll need supporting documentation from a relevant medical professional (for example a letter from your doctor or a copy of your prescription).

Airport staff might need to open the containers to screen the liquids at the security point. Medical equipment is screened separately."

Glasgow Airport       

"You are only permitted to carry quantities of liquid medication in excess of your personal liquid allowance where it is needed during the course of your flight. All medication should be accompanied by documentary proof of authenticity, such as a prescription or letter from a medical practitioner confirming that you need them for your journey. Liquid medication that is not required on the flight should be carried as hold luggage."

Leeds Bradford Airport

“You are allowed to carry essential medicines of more than 100ml in your hand luggage. Remember to take a sufficient supply for your journey, your stay in your destination, and a reasonable amount to cover any delays. Please ensure you bring a prescription or written documentation from your doctor stating that you require the medication. Extra supplies can be carried in your hand luggage.”

Liverpool Airport

"Essential medicines may be permitted in large quantities above the 100ml limit, but will be subject to authentication. All medicines should carry the prescription label clearly showing the name of the passenger."

London City Airport

“Medication in a liquid form carried in a container that exceeds 100ml is permitted as hand baggage but must be supported by a prescription or a documentation from a medical practitioner.)

London Gatwick Airport

"Medicines over 100ml, supported by a doctor's note or prescription, are allowed through security. There’s no limit for powder or pills.

All medicines are subject to additional security screening and must be kept in a transparent, re-sealable bag."

London Heathrow

“Liquid medicines: You are only permitted to carry quantities of liquid medication in excess of your personal liquid allowance where it is needed during the course of your flight. All medication should be accompanied by documentary proof of authenticity, such as a prescription or letter from a medical practitioner confirming that you need them for your journey. Liquid medication that is not required on the flight should be carried as hold luggage.”

London Luton Airport

 "Medicines over 100ml or 100g, supported by a doctor’s note or prescription are allowed through security. 

Please remove your medication from your hand luggage and place in a tray. Following x-ray screening, your bag may be subject to further inspection by a Security Officer. "

London Southend Airport

"If you need to carry more than 100ml of liquid medicines in your hand luggage, you should obtain approval from your airline and bring a valid prescription in your name, this will be cross referenced against the passport holder.

Always carry your prescription with you, or a statement from a medical professional."

London Stansted Airport

“A passenger may take prescription medication in containers over 100ml through security, provided that they have a prescription or doctor's note for the medication. The passenger may only carry through security the quantity of liquid medication that is required for their journey.”

Manchester Airport

“A passenger may take prescription medication in containers over 100ml through security, provided that they have a prescription or doctor's note for the medication. The passenger may only carry through security the quantity of liquid medication that is required for their journey.”

Newcastle Airport

"Essential medicines for the period of the trip may be permitted in larger quantities above the 100ml limit, however they will be subject to a separate screening process, authentication and passengers must have obtained the prior agreement of their airline.

If passengers need to carry medicine of this nature they must also carry with them supporting documentation, either a prescription and/or letter from a relevant qualified medical professional."

Southampton Airport         

“Liquid medicines: You may be asked to provide evidence that you need them for your journey. Additional tests may be conducted."

Government advice on carriage of medicines and medical equipment on planes

Here is what the government website says

Medicine or equipment

Allowed in hand luggage

Allowed in hold luggage

Tablets and capsules Yes Yes
Essential liquid medicines Yes Yes
Hypodermic syringes Yes Yes
Inhalers Yes Yes
Cooling gel packs Yes Yes
Medical equipment (for example CPAP and TENS machines) Yes Yes
Special food and liquids needed for medical reasons Yes Yes
Oxygen cylinders Contact your airline
Contact your airline
Please check with your airline and airport prior to departure. This information for guidance only. 
 
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